Typing on Computer

Distance Learning for Educators

Everglades, Shaped by Fire- Everglades National Park Video, Resources and Lessons


Double click video to enlarge Learn more about the importance of fire in the Everglades by watching Everglades - Shaped by Fire from Everglades National Park’s Education Team. After watching the video, have students answer the discussion questions listed below on your online learning platform. 1. Why is the Pine Rocklands habitat being burned? 2. What are the two ways fire starts in the Everglades? 3. What are the benefits of burning in the Everglades? 4. Describe the fire adaptation of the slash pine tree. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection: Grades 3-5, Grade 3 Lesson 2 - Classifying Everglades Plants and their Habitats https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade - Students will identify plants of the Everglades using a dichotomous key and become familiar with the five different habitats of the Everglades where these plants live.




Odyssey Earth 360 Degree Videos and Field Observation Datasheets


Dive a little deeper to introduce your students to the watery world of the Everglades! Check out these interactive 360 degree videos on habitats such as the cypress dome, mangrove swamp, sawgrass prairie, and seagrass meadow. Each video comes with a field guide and scavenger hunt questions. Visit: http://www.odysseyearth.com/video-category/everglades-360/ Click to download datasheets and teacher guide below: Cypress Dome Field Datasheet Mangrove Fringe Field Datasheet Sawgrass Prairie Field Datasheet Seagrass Meadow Field Datasheet Teacher Guide with Answer Key




Everglades, Adapt to Survive- Everglades National Park Video, Resources and Lessons


Double click video to enlarge Learn more about the amazing adaptations that plants and animals have in Everglades National Park! An Adaptation is a characteristic that allows an organism to live successfully in its environment. There are three types of adaptations; structural, physical, and behavioral. After watching the video, have students answer the discussion questions on your online learning platform using the attached worksheets. Download here: Adapting in the Everglades Worksheet Download here: Everglades, Adapt to Survive Worksheet Looking for the Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection? Check out the 2 lessons we think fit great with this video. Grades 3-5, Grade 3 Lesson 1 - Classifying Everglades Animals and their Habitats https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade - Students will learn that animals can be classified into six major animal groups and become familiar with Everglades animals in these groups. Students will also learn about the five different habitats of the Everglades where these animals live. Grades 9-12, Amazing Adaptations Lesson 1 - Living on the Edge https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-amazing-adaptations -Students learn about the unique adaptations mangroves have that allow them to live in coastal communities. Students construct models to demonstrate how mangroves help protect shorelines and contribute to the growth of the peninsula.




Florida Aquifers and Springs, Odyssey Earth Video, Resources and Lessons


Ready to learn more about Florida’s aquifers and springs? Watch this video to explore these environments and learn how important they are for our drinking water. http://www.odysseyearth.com/videos/floridas-aquifers-and-springs/ Test your knowledge by answering True/False questions (answers can be found on the Odyssey Earth website). True/False 1. Aquifers are usually made up of types of rock that are dense and impenetrable by water. 2. Residents of South Florida get most of their water from the Floridan Aquifer. 3. Florida has more artesian springs than any other region in the world. 4. The underwater caverns of Florida are created over time by mildly-acidic water, which slowly dissolves the limestone rock. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grades 5-8, Grade 7 Lesson 2 - The Everglades and Aquifers https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/seventh-grade -Students will explore the important relationships of aquifers to the Everglades and residents of southern Florida and build an aquifer model. Have students design an aquifer in a cup digitally or provide them with a digital version. Grades 5-8, Grade 7 Lesson 3 - Groundwater Pollution https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/seventh-grade -Students will use the aquifer model from lesson 2 - The Everglades and Aquifers, to discusspollution, how it affects the Everglades, and the different ways we use water.




Invasive Species in the Everglades - Part 1, Video and Worksheet


Do you know the difference between a native and invasive species? Native species are naturally occurring in an area and invasive species are introduced to an area by humans where you would not find them naturally. In most cases, invasive species compete with native species for resources, especially food resources. The Everglades has a high number of invasive species living in the ecosystem. Watch this video from Everglades National Park to learn more about the effects of invasive species in the Everglades and how the ecosystem is adapting and being restored. Double click video to enlarge You’ll be surprised that maybe you have seen an invasive species close to home! Take the Burmese python, a snake from Southeast Asia that has disrupted the Everglades like no other. How was it introduced to the Everglades? What effects does it have on the food chain? Is there anything we can do to stop them? There are hundreds of invasive species living in the Everglades, but have you met The Dirty Dozen? Learn about 12 invasive species in the Everglades who are damaging the environment at an alarming rate. Learn more about their origin, introduction to the environment, impact, and what you can do. Visit the Everglades Invasive Species website: http://www.evergladescisma.org/ Choose 2-3 invasive species to research. Use the Invasive Species Worksheet to answer questions about that invasive species. Learn more about the Invasive Species Curve to find where your selected species is on the curve: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw392 Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grade 5 Lesson 2- Invasive Species https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/fifth-grade After reviewing The Dirty Dozen, learn about 20 invasive species in the Everglades and test your riddle skills. Students will examine the effects of exotic and invasive species in an ecosystem using riddles and research. Students will be able to explain how exotic and invasive species can harm native species or habitats in the Everglades.




If I Had a Wish for Water Story, Video, Worksheet. and Resources


The Everglades is the primary source of fresh water for people, plants, and animals in southern Florida. Water conservation is something that everyone can help with. Saving water in our daily use will help keep water available for us all, including Everglades animals and plants. In this lesson students will identify some of the different ways humans use and waste water in their daily lives and have fun finding the rhyming words in the story. Have students read or watch If I Had a Wish for Water and complete the attached handout: Link here Once you’re done with the worksheet, go outside and look for ways people, plants, and animals are using water. Make a list of what you see, or take pictures of the examples you see and share them on social media using #EvergladesLiteracy or make your own rhyming wish for water and draw a picture about how you use water in your life. Looking for the Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection? Check out two lessons we think fit great with this one. Grades K-2, Grade 1 Lesson 3 – Water for Us All https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/first-grade -Students will discuss and identify the different ways humans and animals use water. They will complete a matching handout and make the connection that the Everglades is the primary source of freshwater for people, plants, and animals in southern Florida. Grades 6-8, Grade 6 Lesson 2 – A Drop in the Bucket https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/sixth-grade -Students will learn about the quantity of freshwater available on Earth and in the Everglades through an experiment.




Everglades Backyard Bioblitz, Worksheet and Resources


Ready for another adventure? Get your students to learn about Everglades habitats by exploring outside, or from indoors, using online resources in this Everglades Backyard Bioblitz!
Traditionally, a BioBlitz is an event where scientists, naturalists, and volunteers focus on identifying and cataloging as many species as possible in a specific time period. This helps scientists gather data of the biodiversity in a specific area. Have your class conduct their own bioblitz using nature identification apps like iNaturalist or Picture This. Limited access to nature or no apps available? Have them draw the image, make observations, and conduct online research to identify the species. Have the class ready to share through distance learning to sort their species into 5 major animal groups: mammal, bird, fish, reptile, amphibian, and arthropod. Put all the plants to the side in their own group. Take it a step further and classify which Everglades habitat they may be commonly found: Hardwood hammock, Cypress swamp, Mangrove swamp, Pinelands, and/or Sawgrass marsh. Click here to view the Everglades habitats. If needed, use the Habitat Spider Map from the Everglades Teacher Toolkit 3.1 Have each student share one-by-one and present their animal or plant, one fact they learned from their research, and why it belongs in the habitat by saying, “I am a/an {name of plant/animal} __________ and I belong in the {classification group} _________. I can be found in the {Everglades habitat} ____________ because {fact}____________________. Assessment Questions: 1. What are some of the characteristics we used to sort our Everglades animals into animal groups? 2. Does each habitat provide a home for all the animals or plants? 3. Do some animals or plants depend on more than one habitat? 4. Are all the different habitats necessary? Note: Teachers can create their own research cards or use these already made Species Identification Card provided by National Geographic Everglades Literacy Teacher Toolkit Connections: Grade 3 Lesson 1 - Classifying Everglades Animals and Their Habitats https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade -Students will learn that animals can be classified into six major animal groups and become familiar with Everglades animals in these groups. Students will also learn about the five different habitats of the Everglades where these animals live. Grades 9-12 Amazing Adaptations Lesson 3 - Crossing Lines https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-amazing-adaptations -Students will explain the concepts of “ecotone” and “edge effect”, and use a diagram to describe how this relates to biological diversity.




Invasive Species in the Everglades - Part 2, Compare and Contrast 2 Species, Worksheet and Resources


Let’s begin by reviewing some important definitions: Native species are animals and plants that live in an area naturally, without any human intervention. Nonnative (exotic, alien) species are animals and plants living outside their native ranges as a result of human activity. Invasive species are nonnative plants or animals that cause harm to the environment, economy, or human health. Did you know that Florida has more nonnative reptile and amphibian species than anywhere else in the world? And that more than 80% of the nonnative reptiles and amphibians in Florida arrived here through the pet trade? Worldwide, invasive species are one of the top causes of species endangerment and extinction. In this lesson, students will investigate two Everglades invasive species part of the Dirty Dozen using both video and written resources. Students will complete a T-chart to summarize the information they found on both species and they will compare and contrast these two species by completing a Venn diagram. Click to download T-chart Click to download Venn diagram Watch the video, Invasion of the Snakehead, http://www.odysseyearth.com/videos/invasion-of-the-snakeheads/ and begin to complete your T-chart. Now, read about the Bullseye Snakehead using this factsheet to complete the Snakehead column of your T-chart. https://www.evergladescisma.org/the-dirty-dozen/bullseye-snakehead/ Now you are ready to investigate a second Everglades invasive species, the Tegu Lizard. Watch this video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2gsX6Na1o0 And read this factsheet, https://www.evergladescisma.org/the-dirty-dozen/tegu-lizards/ to complete the second column of your T-chart. Now, use the information you collected in your T-chart to complete the Venn diagram that compares and contrasts these two Everglades invasive species. Click to download Invasive Species T-Chart Teacher Key




American Alligators Vs. American Crocodiles, Video and T-Chart


Did you know there are thousands of species that live in the Everglades? They all play an important role in the Everglades ecosystem. Today we are going to focus on one of the most well-known Everglades species of all, an iconic, powerful reptile species that has over 1 million of them living in the state of Florida alone. Did you guess the American alligator? There is so much to learn about the American alligator, a species that is protected and vital to the Everglades ecosystem. American alligators are a keystone species in the Everglades, a species that changes the environment for its own use in a way that helps other plants and animals. Learn more about the American alligator by watching this video from Everglades National Park. Did you learn about the other reptilian species that lives in the Everglades too? The Everglades is the only place in the world that is home to both the American alligator and American crocodile! After viewing the video, fill out the T-chart to describe the following differences between each species:

  • Shape of the snout
  • Skin color
  • Teeth
  • Habitat
Click to download T-chart Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grade 2 - Lesson 2 Everglades Seasons https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/second-grade -Students will act out an ecodrama in an alligator hole during the dry season. Each student will play a role of an animal that depends on the alligator hole. Students will identify the American alligator as a keystone species that enables other species to survive. Extension: To learn more about alligator holes and why they are important, have your students act out a virtual ecodrama! Each student will be assigned a species that uses the alligator hole for survival. Have your students make a hat or a sign that indicates which species they are and when it is their turn to act, have them make the sounds and move like the animal would in the ecosystem. Extension Wrap-up: Have the students answer the following questions in their science notebooks:
  • What are the two seasons that occur in the Everglades? Wet and dry.
  • Why are Alligators important to other wildlife? As a keystone species, they change their environment and provide for other species.
  • What does the American alligator provide for wildlife? Water and a place to live.
  • What does the wildlife provide for the American alligator? Food.
  • Why do American alligators dig these alligator holes? To create a home.
  • How do alligator holes help other animals? Provide water and food.
  • How can we help protect the American alligator? Answers will vary but should include habitat protection, do not feed the wildlife, no illegal hunting, etc.




Everglades H.I.P.P.O.(C). Threats- Acrostic Activity Sheet


The Everglades provides ecosystem services, or natural services that support life on Earth and are essential to the quality of human life and to the functioning of the world’s economy. The wetlands in the Everglades filter and clean the water, giving us fresh water to drink, and the different habitats provide flood control, water storage, and protection. This is why it is so important to protect the Everglades. But the Everglades is in trouble. Using the acronym H.I.P.P.O. (C), we can learn about some of the threats to the Everglades. An acronym is a form of abbreviation used for many purposes, like remembering something. An acrostic is a poem in which certain letters in each line form words or sentences.
Directions: After reviewing the H.I.P.P.O. (C), threats, students will use the word map below to create an acrostic poem using the words provided for each threat. Click to download Everglades acrostic activity sheet and word map H-Habitat Loss- When plants and animals’ habitats are converted from usable to unusable habitat. I-Invasive Species- Organisms that are harmful when introduction or spread threatens the natural environment. P- Pollution- The introduction of contaminants into the natural environment that cause negative change. P- Human Population- Total number of humans living on earth. More people require more land space and other resources. O- Overconsumption- A situation where resource use has outpaced the sustainable capacity of the ecosystem. C- Climate Change- The change in global patterns, attributed largely to the increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced using fossil fuels. Everglades Literacy Connection: Grade 8, Lesson 2 Threats to the Everglades https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/eighth-grade -Students will evaluate different benefits (ecosystem services) that the Everglades provides to humans. They will learn about six different threats that impact the Everglades ecosystem and humans, and design a poster for each threat.




How Conserving a Species Works- A Look Into the Florida Panther Recovery Plan (Third Revision) by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (FWS), Resources and Worksheet


Big cat conservation has been in the news quite a lot recently. In the Everglades, big cat conservation is especially important for one of the most at risk species in the world. Have you ever wondered exactly how wildlife conservation works? Learn more about the efforts to save the Florida panther. The Florida panther is Florida’s state mammal and is the last subspecies of Puma still surviving in the eastern United States. It is listed as endangered, a species "in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range". These species are rare to find and are top priority for wildlife conservationists to save. This video explains what has caused the Florida panther’s overall decline, primarily from humans and habitat loss But, that is not to say humans have not taken action to reduce their impact on the panthers’ survival in the Florida Everglades. In fact, as a product of the collaboration of various recovery teams, contractors, state agencies, and others, the Florida Panther Recovery Plan (Third Revision) was created and published in 2008 by the U.S. Florida Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The goal of this detailed recovery plan is to achieve long-term viability of the Florida panther in its wild habitat in the Everglades. With the dedication of many entities involved in the creation of this plan, it is clear how important recovery is for the Florida panther. Directions: Have your students read the Florida Panther Recovery Plan excerpt pages 1-14 (click to download) After reading, have your students use their critical thinking and analysis skills to complete the student activity worksheet about the Florida Panther Recovery Plan. Please keep in mind this article is intended for higher grade levels, however this activity may be adapted for younger grades. Click to download Florida panther recovery plan worksheet Click to download Florida panther recovery plan answer key For additional information visit: FWS’s Recovery Planning and Implementation Page: https://www.fws.gov/endangered/esa-library/pdf/RPI.pdf FWS’s ECOS Environmental Conservation Online System showing all wildlife species with Recovery Plans: https://ecos.fws.gov/ecp0/reports/species-with-recovery-plans-report Everglades Literacy Connections: Grade 5. Lesson 1 - Incredible Shrinking Habitat https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/fifth-grade​​​​​​​ -Students will become Florida panthers, white-tailed deer, and motor vehicles in an active, tag-like game to simulate the disappearance of Everglades habitat and its effect on native wildlife.




South Florida’s National Parks Video and Worksheet


Happy National Park Week--get to know South Florida’s National Parks! Watch this Odyssey Earth video to learn more about Everglades National Park, Biscayne National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, and Dry Tortugas National Park. Each of these sites is unique and home to a variety of wildlife on land and in the water. Students will fill out the worksheet as they watch along with the Odyssey Earth video. Ask your students which park they want to visit the most! Do you or your students have any pictures or memories from visiting one of these national parks? Share with us! Please use the hashtag #EvergladesLiteracy and tag The Everglades Foundation social media handles: Facebook: @evergladesfoundation Twitter: @evergfoundation Instagram: @evergladesfoundation




Everglades Water Flow: Historic vs. Altered


If someone were to tell you that you live in the Everglades, would you believe them? Historically, the Everglades watershed spans about one-third of our state historically, starting near Kissimmee and spanning all the way down to Florida Bay. If you live in the Everglades watershed region, you are living in an altered Everglades ecosystem. It provides us with resources like fresh water and is important for tourism, the economy, and so much more. Learn more about the historic and altered Everglades watershed by watching this River of Grass video by Odyssey Earth and filling out the Anticipation Guide. Then use the Everglades Water Flow: Historic and Altered Worksheet to navigate through the changes to the watershed and understand how it impacts us, wildlife, and the economy. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection: Grades 9-12: The Heart of a Watershed --In small groups, students build a landscape model to illustrate the uniqueness of the Kissimmee-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades (K-O-E) watershed, and then modify the model to demonstrate how alterations have affected the K-O-E watershed.




Everglades History Timeline Activity, Worksheet and Answer Key


Why should we understand past events that have shaped the Everglades? To find ways to restore the Everglades, we need to understand how the Everglades functioned before the area was drained and developed, beginning in the late 1800s. We should also celebrate the important events that have happened and are still happening that contribute to restoring the Everglades. While it is impossible to return the entire Everglades to pre-development conditions, understanding how the Everglades has been modified by people helps us understand the current challenges to Everglades restoration and how to best meet those challenges with sound solutions. With this Everglades History Timeline Activity, do online research to match specific Everglades history events to the dates on the provided timeline to create a timeline of the Everglades, past and present. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grades 6-8, Grade 6, Lesson 1 – Kissimmee – Lake Okeechobee – Everglades (K-O-E) Students will be able to identify locations and waterways in the Kissimmee-Okeechobee-Everglades (K-O-E) watershed on a map after watching a video and reading a story. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/sixth-grade Grades 9-12, Environmental Factors of the Everglades, Lesson 1 – Heart of a Watershed In small groups, students build a landscape model to illustrate the uniqueness of the Kissimmee-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades (K-O-E) watershed, and then modify the model to demonstrate how alterations have affected the K-O-E watershed. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-our-watershed




Pig Frog and Shell-Less Egg Experiment


How is an egg like a pig frog in the Everglades? A pig frog is an indicator species. An indicator species is defined as a species whose abundance in any given area is believed to indicate certain environmental or ecological conditions or suitable conditions for a group of other species. For example, a high concentration of pig frogs in an area, like the Everglades, indicates that the wetland ecosystem has good water quality and an overall healthy system. The pig frog has semi-permeable skin allowing some of the water to pass through in order for it to breath and hydrate. If the water is full of toxins and pollutants, then the toxins can pass through the pig frog’s skin and negatively affects the health of the pig frog. Pig frogs are animals that scientists use to check on the wellness of the Everglades ecosystem. If something is wrong with these animals, then it is a good chance that there is a bigger problem that needs to be fixed in the ecosystem. Like the pig frog skin, the egg has a semi-permeable membrane. It lets some water pass through it while trying to keep the bacteria out. Follow along with this experiment that can be done at home to learn more about the pig frog's skin: Click to download student experiment sheet. Follow along with this video of the experiment: Click to download video. Watch this short video clip to see what other cool things scientists are learning about pig frogs in the Everglades: Everglades pig frog video.




How Florida Droughts Affect the Everglades and Us


There are many challenges associated with Everglades restoration, particularly with the quantity and timing of available water. Too much or too little water adversely affects the Everglades ecosystems, Florida residents living in urban areas, and the economy of the state. The periods of low rainfall in combination with water supply operations create lower water levels in the Everglades, resulting in droughts. Precisely, a drought is defined as “a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall, leading to a shortage of water”. To better understand the potential impacts of droughts on the Everglades and us, watch this Economic Impact of Droughts in South Florida presentation by the 2011 Arthur R. Marshall Foundation Summer Interns. Directions: Have students watch the Economic Impact of Droughts in South Florida presentation. After watching, have your students use their critical thinking and analysis skills to complete the student activity worksheet. Please keep in mind this video presentation is intended for higher grade levels, however this activity may be adapted for younger grades. Student Activity Worksheet Student Activity Worksheet Answer Key For additional information visit: ● The U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM) online map: https://www.drought.gov/drought/states/florida ● Long-term drought conditions by the Florida Division of Emergency Management: https://www.floridadisaster.org/hazards/drought/ Everglades Literacy Connections: Grades 9-12 Water Use and Society: Lesson 2: A Question of Quantity --Students will look at a typical water conservation plan and analyze it from the viewpoint of various stakeholders. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-water-use-and-society Grades 9-12 Everglades Restoration: Lesson 3: A look at CERP --Students will analyze information about various current and ongoing Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) projects and report on the progress that is being made. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-everglades-restoration Grade 8 Human Impacts: Lesson 1: Sponging Off the Everglades --Students will participate in a lab experiment where they identify the different water users in the Everglades and how much water is consumed by each user group. Students will recognize ways to conserve water and discuss why water conservation is important to the Everglades. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/eighth-grade




Everglades Wildlife Watch: Observing the Bald Eagle


The Bald Eagle was selected as the national bird of the United States in 1782 and this iconic bird of prey lives in the Florida Everglades. In this lesson, students will observe through a live webcam what is happening at any given time in an active Bald Eagle nest located in southwestern Florida. Over the course of three days, they will use an observation journal with guiding questions to make qualitative observations about these Bald Eagles and their activities and record their data using an ethogram chart. Encourage your students to describe what they see in detail; this will help them identify key characteristics of their focus of study and make more knowledgeable inferences. Everglades Wildlife Watch: Observing the Bald Eagle Lesson Plan Student Page and Ethogram Chart Bald Eagle Observation Journal Additional Standards: SC.1.N.1.2, SC.4SCN.1.6, SC.K.N.1.5, SC.2.N.1.1 Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections:

Grade 3, Lesson 1 – Hurry for a Habitat --Students will use a relay race activity to reinforce knowledge learned in Lesson 1 and Lesson 2 (Everglades habitats, animals, and plants). https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade

Grades 9-12 Adaptations in Everglades Ecosystems Lesson 2: Design a Perfect Beast --Students become “bioengineers” by engineering an animal that is adapted to a specific Everglades ecosystem, creating “perfect beast.” https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-amazing-adaptations




Build an Airboat at Home STEM Activity


Have you ever been on an airboat before? Have you ever wondered how scientists, researchers, and even students travel into the heart of the Everglades to study its plant and wildlife? The answer is airboats! Learn more about how airboats work, how they are built, and watch a tutorial of how you can make an airboat at home with this lesson plan: Click to download lesson plan. Watch a video of an airboat gliding through the Everglades here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JGvHQTTm5E Then watch how an airboat is made here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LSjA8Jn7J4 Use the engineering process to design and create your own airboat, and watch as a member of The Everglades Foundation Education Team builds an airboat at home!




The Floridian Flamingo-Reading Comprehension


The American Flamingo, also known as the Floridian Flamingo, is the icon of the tropics. You've seen them everywhere; adorning flower beds and pools, gracing neon signs, and printed on vacation style clothing. Read The Floridian Flamingo article by Dr. Ruscena Wiederholt to explore the history of the flamingo in our state and discover its connection in South Florida. Click to download reading comprehension questions.




Butterflies of South Florida - Reading Comprehension


Butterflies are an important part of Florida’s ecosystem. An abundance of butterflies usually indicates that an ecosystem is thriving. Butterflies are also pollinators, in that they carry pollen to a new plant helping it produce seeds and grow, giving us flowers and food to eat. Read the article here: Butterflies of South Florida Download the comprehensive questions worksheet here: Butterflies of South Florida Reading Comprehension




Snowy Egrets - Reading Comprehension


While we are in the middle of a hot, Florida summer, there is one Everglades bird species who looks like it has been snowed on recently. Snowy egrets have fluffy, white feathers resembling messy hairdos in the wind. These plumes were once so popular in women’s fashion that they were worth twice their weight in gold. Learn more about the beautiful plumes and unique physical features of the snowy egret by reading Snow Animals of the Everglades and download the reading comprehension questions.




Burmese Pythons in your Backyard - Reading Comprehension


What's taller than a giraffe, weighs up to 200 pounds, and can swallow deer in a single gulp? If you guessed Burmese python, the notorious invader of South Florida, you're correct! Learn all about how this invasive species came to be in South Florida, and what to do if you spot one in this reading comprehensive activity. Read the article excerpt: Burmese Pythons in your Backyard Download the reading comprehensive questions here: Comprehensive Questions




Everglades Habitats Mapping Activity


In this activity, students will create their own maps of Everglades habitats. Students will learn about the five important components of a map, review Everglades habitats, plants and animals, and use their creative skills to draw their own version of an Everglades habitat map. Download Everglades Habitats Mapping Activity here Download Student Procedures here Download Everglades Mapping Activity PowerPoint National Geographic mapping resources




Compare and Contrast: Organisms of the Everglades


The Everglades is a special place in Florida and home to nearly 2,000 plant and animal species. These include the Florida panther, West Indian manatee, Roseate spoonbill, cypress trees, mangrove trees, and so many more. Use the Everglades Organisms Compare and Contrast Worksheet to learn more about 8 Everglades animal species. Students will review the physical traits of each species, explain how they are used for survival, and classify their species into the correct animal group. Compare and Contrast Worksheet Compare and Contrast Answer Key Wrap up by asking your students which species is their favorite and if they have seen it in the wild before.




Chief Scientist of The Everglades Foundation


Hear from the Chief Scientist of The Everglades Foundation as she describes research and modeling programs designed to better understand origins and localized levels of phosphourous pollution in the Everglades. Video and Lesson Plan link Guided Note-Taking Sheet Follow along with the Guided Note-Taking Sheet provided for research methods to understand Phosphorous in the Everglades.




Protecting our Everglades and Connecting to our Watershed: From Home and Always


Do you know where your water comes from? There are 8.7 million residents of south Florida (1 out of 3 Floridians) who rely on the Everglades for their water supply. Join us to learn more about The Everglades Foundation’s educational programming as we navigate through the Everglades watershed using an interactive presentation focusing on water usage, where our water comes from, and the importance of the Everglades ecosystem. Understanding the Everglades watershed ensures future generations of Floridians understand the ecological and economic value of the Everglades ecosystem. Water is important to the health of the Everglades, and the health of the Everglades is important to us! Click to download Everglades Watershed Worksheet




Be on the Lookout for Birds STEM Activity


Can't get outside? Look out your window! There are 349 species of birds that live in the Everglades! Can you name one? See if you can draw a picture of a bird and the habitat that it lives in. Explore and research some regional species that you may see: Blue Jay, Northern Cardinal, Northern Mockingbird, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Tufted Titmouse. Use this Bird Research Sheet to record your findings. STEM Challenge: After researching your species plan and design a bird feeder using recycled materials. Use this Student Sheet: Bird Feeder to help you with this challenge. Want to learn more? Check out this Bird Bingo activity from Florida Audubon. https://fl.audubon.org/sites/default/files/bingo_card_0.pdf




Everglades Swamp Symphony


Encourage your students to step outside and explore the natural world around them using their senses! Do you hear that? Find a safe outdoor space, close your eyes, take a deep breath, and listen. Try to block out all the sounds made by people, and tune into all the magical sounds of our natural world. It sounds like a symphony, an elaborate musical composition that has many notes and sounds. Challenge yourself to take it a step further, conduct a little research, and to match the sounds with the actual animal. Do you think they live in the Everglades? Have you students or children use this interactive website from SwampScapes to make their own Swamp Symphony. Record it and share it with your classmates in your next virtual meetup. Swamp Symphony: http://swampscapes.org/swamp-symphony.html Everglades Literacy Connections: 1st grade Lesson 1- Everglades Animal Exploration https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/first-grade Students will learn that animals communicate through their senses. The students will use their knowledge and imagination to vocally and/or physically imitate wildlife of the Everglades. Kindergarten Lesson 3 - Who Lives in the Everglades? https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/kindergarten Students will engage in an interactive presentation to review some of the animals that live in the Everglades. Then, they follow up with classifying animals that do and do not live in the Florida Everglades.





 
 
Family

Everglades Activities    for Families

Everglades Haiku Worksheet and Activity


Looking for an Everglades activity to share with parents to do with the family at home? Share with them this Everglades Haiku Worksheet where students can create their own Everglades haiku. You can even take it a step further by sharing a photo that corresponds with your haiku! Everglades Haiku Worksheet Once your students and families have written their haikus, we encourage you to share 1-2 haikus in the Everglades Literacy Facebook group! If you or parents are posting on your personal accounts, please use the hashtag #EvergladesLiteracy and tag The Everglades Foundation social media handles: Facebook: @evergladesfoundation Twitter: @evergfoundation Instagram: @evergladesfoundation




Who Lives in the Everglades- Coloring Book by Mac and Hannah Stone


Click on the image to download!




Everglades Bookmark Activity


Click to download bookmark activity




Everglades Seasons Eco Drama - Spanish Translation


Click to download Everglades Seasons Eco Drama in Spanish Grade 2 Lesson 2, Everglades Seasons https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/second-grade -Students will act out an ecodrama in an alligator hole during the dry season. Each student will play the role of an animal that depends on the alligator hole. Students will identify the American alligator as a keystone species that enables other species to survive.




Everlades Literacy Social Media Bingo


Click to download the bingo card




If I Had a Wish For Water- Read Aloud and Resources


Join us as Susan Toth, the Everglades Literacy Program Assistant and the author of "If I Had a Wish for Water" reads us her book about conserving water. The water that we use today is the same water that has always been on Earth. The water is recycled over and over in different forms. The rain that showers on us, once showered the dinosaurs, George Washington, and Albert Einstein, etc. Water is very important to the health of the Everglades, and the health of the Everglades is very important to us! Water conservation is something that everyone can help with. Saving water in our daily use will help keep the water available for other animals and plants in the future. Download many uses for water worksheet: Here Download Water For Us All T-Chart: Here




Who's in the Habitat?


Take a look at this picture. Find all the living things and how they are using water in the Everglades.




Threats to the Everglades Word Search


Click to download Word Search Click to download Answer Key




Picture It!


Notice, think, and wonder about the Everglades using these "Picture It! worksheets. Then go outside and take a picture of a plant, animal, or habitat in your community, and make your own Picture It! activity.




Everglades Animals Food Sources Matching Game


Who's hungry? Discover Everglades animals' food sources by playing this fun matching game. Download matching game





Storytime

Storytime with Ms. Colleen

ms. colleen.jpg

Ms. Colleen

Ms. Colleen loves books, science, and teaching. She works for the University of Florida as both a literacy professional developer with the James Patterson Literacy Challenge and a doctoral student studying special education and dyslexia. Colleen also works with the Everglades Foundation as a teacher trainer, promoting environmental science education across Florida. Prior to this work, Colleen was an elementary school teacher. Reading to her students was always her favorite part of each school day. Colleen lives in Fort Lauderdale, Florida with her husband and two dogs.

Welcome to Storytime with Ms. Colleen!

Everglades, Shaped by Fire- Everglades National Park Video, Resources and Lessons


Double click video to enlarge Learn more about the importance of fire in the Everglades by watching Everglades - Shaped by Fire from Everglades National Park’s Education Team. After watching the video, have students answer the discussion questions listed below on your online learning platform. 1. Why is the Pine Rocklands habitat being burned? 2. What are the two ways fire starts in the Everglades? 3. What are the benefits of burning in the Everglades? 4. Describe the fire adaptation of the slash pine tree. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection: Grades 3-5, Grade 3 Lesson 2 - Classifying Everglades Plants and their Habitats https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade - Students will identify plants of the Everglades using a dichotomous key and become familiar with the five different habitats of the Everglades where these plants live.




Odyssey Earth 360 Degree Videos and Field Observation Datasheets


Dive a little deeper to introduce your students to the watery world of the Everglades! Check out these interactive 360 degree videos on habitats such as the cypress dome, mangrove swamp, sawgrass prairie, and seagrass meadow. Each video comes with a field guide and scavenger hunt questions. Visit: http://www.odysseyearth.com/video-category/everglades-360/ Click to download datasheets and teacher guide below: Cypress Dome Field Datasheet Mangrove Fringe Field Datasheet Sawgrass Prairie Field Datasheet Seagrass Meadow Field Datasheet Teacher Guide with Answer Key




Everglades, Adapt to Survive- Everglades National Park Video, Resources and Lessons


Double click video to enlarge Learn more about the amazing adaptations that plants and animals have in Everglades National Park! An Adaptation is a characteristic that allows an organism to live successfully in its environment. There are three types of adaptations; structural, physical, and behavioral. After watching the video, have students answer the discussion questions on your online learning platform using the attached worksheets. Download here: Adapting in the Everglades Worksheet Download here: Everglades, Adapt to Survive Worksheet Looking for the Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection? Check out the 2 lessons we think fit great with this video. Grades 3-5, Grade 3 Lesson 1 - Classifying Everglades Animals and their Habitats https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade - Students will learn that animals can be classified into six major animal groups and become familiar with Everglades animals in these groups. Students will also learn about the five different habitats of the Everglades where these animals live. Grades 9-12, Amazing Adaptations Lesson 1 - Living on the Edge https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-amazing-adaptations -Students learn about the unique adaptations mangroves have that allow them to live in coastal communities. Students construct models to demonstrate how mangroves help protect shorelines and contribute to the growth of the peninsula.




Florida Aquifers and Springs, Odyssey Earth Video, Resources and Lessons


Ready to learn more about Florida’s aquifers and springs? Watch this video to explore these environments and learn how important they are for our drinking water. http://www.odysseyearth.com/videos/floridas-aquifers-and-springs/ Test your knowledge by answering True/False questions (answers can be found on the Odyssey Earth website). True/False 1. Aquifers are usually made up of types of rock that are dense and impenetrable by water. 2. Residents of South Florida get most of their water from the Floridan Aquifer. 3. Florida has more artesian springs than any other region in the world. 4. The underwater caverns of Florida are created over time by mildly-acidic water, which slowly dissolves the limestone rock. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grades 5-8, Grade 7 Lesson 2 - The Everglades and Aquifers https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/seventh-grade -Students will explore the important relationships of aquifers to the Everglades and residents of southern Florida and build an aquifer model. Have students design an aquifer in a cup digitally or provide them with a digital version. Grades 5-8, Grade 7 Lesson 3 - Groundwater Pollution https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/seventh-grade -Students will use the aquifer model from lesson 2 - The Everglades and Aquifers, to discusspollution, how it affects the Everglades, and the different ways we use water.




Invasive Species in the Everglades - Part 1, Video and Worksheet


Do you know the difference between a native and invasive species? Native species are naturally occurring in an area and invasive species are introduced to an area by humans where you would not find them naturally. In most cases, invasive species compete with native species for resources, especially food resources. The Everglades has a high number of invasive species living in the ecosystem. Watch this video from Everglades National Park to learn more about the effects of invasive species in the Everglades and how the ecosystem is adapting and being restored. Double click video to enlarge You’ll be surprised that maybe you have seen an invasive species close to home! Take the Burmese python, a snake from Southeast Asia that has disrupted the Everglades like no other. How was it introduced to the Everglades? What effects does it have on the food chain? Is there anything we can do to stop them? There are hundreds of invasive species living in the Everglades, but have you met The Dirty Dozen? Learn about 12 invasive species in the Everglades who are damaging the environment at an alarming rate. Learn more about their origin, introduction to the environment, impact, and what you can do. Visit the Everglades Invasive Species website: http://www.evergladescisma.org/ Choose 2-3 invasive species to research. Use the Invasive Species Worksheet to answer questions about that invasive species. Learn more about the Invasive Species Curve to find where your selected species is on the curve: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw392 Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grade 5 Lesson 2- Invasive Species https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/fifth-grade After reviewing The Dirty Dozen, learn about 20 invasive species in the Everglades and test your riddle skills. Students will examine the effects of exotic and invasive species in an ecosystem using riddles and research. Students will be able to explain how exotic and invasive species can harm native species or habitats in the Everglades.




If I Had a Wish for Water Story, Video, Worksheet. and Resources


The Everglades is the primary source of fresh water for people, plants, and animals in southern Florida. Water conservation is something that everyone can help with. Saving water in our daily use will help keep water available for us all, including Everglades animals and plants. In this lesson students will identify some of the different ways humans use and waste water in their daily lives and have fun finding the rhyming words in the story. Have students read or watch If I Had a Wish for Water and complete the attached handout: Link here Once you’re done with the worksheet, go outside and look for ways people, plants, and animals are using water. Make a list of what you see, or take pictures of the examples you see and share them on social media using #EvergladesLiteracy or make your own rhyming wish for water and draw a picture about how you use water in your life. Looking for the Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection? Check out two lessons we think fit great with this one. Grades K-2, Grade 1 Lesson 3 – Water for Us All https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/first-grade -Students will discuss and identify the different ways humans and animals use water. They will complete a matching handout and make the connection that the Everglades is the primary source of freshwater for people, plants, and animals in southern Florida. Grades 6-8, Grade 6 Lesson 2 – A Drop in the Bucket https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/sixth-grade -Students will learn about the quantity of freshwater available on Earth and in the Everglades through an experiment.




Everglades Backyard Bioblitz, Worksheet and Resources


Ready for another adventure? Get your students to learn about Everglades habitats by exploring outside, or from indoors, using online resources in this Everglades Backyard Bioblitz!
Traditionally, a BioBlitz is an event where scientists, naturalists, and volunteers focus on identifying and cataloging as many species as possible in a specific time period. This helps scientists gather data of the biodiversity in a specific area. Have your class conduct their own bioblitz using nature identification apps like iNaturalist or Picture This. Limited access to nature or no apps available? Have them draw the image, make observations, and conduct online research to identify the species. Have the class ready to share through distance learning to sort their species into 5 major animal groups: mammal, bird, fish, reptile, amphibian, and arthropod. Put all the plants to the side in their own group. Take it a step further and classify which Everglades habitat they may be commonly found: Hardwood hammock, Cypress swamp, Mangrove swamp, Pinelands, and/or Sawgrass marsh. Click here to view the Everglades habitats. If needed, use the Habitat Spider Map from the Everglades Teacher Toolkit 3.1 Have each student share one-by-one and present their animal or plant, one fact they learned from their research, and why it belongs in the habitat by saying, “I am a/an {name of plant/animal} __________ and I belong in the {classification group} _________. I can be found in the {Everglades habitat} ____________ because {fact}____________________. Assessment Questions: 1. What are some of the characteristics we used to sort our Everglades animals into animal groups? 2. Does each habitat provide a home for all the animals or plants? 3. Do some animals or plants depend on more than one habitat? 4. Are all the different habitats necessary? Note: Teachers can create their own research cards or use these already made Species Identification Card provided by National Geographic Everglades Literacy Teacher Toolkit Connections: Grade 3 Lesson 1 - Classifying Everglades Animals and Their Habitats https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade -Students will learn that animals can be classified into six major animal groups and become familiar with Everglades animals in these groups. Students will also learn about the five different habitats of the Everglades where these animals live. Grades 9-12 Amazing Adaptations Lesson 3 - Crossing Lines https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-amazing-adaptations -Students will explain the concepts of “ecotone” and “edge effect”, and use a diagram to describe how this relates to biological diversity.




Invasive Species in the Everglades - Part 2, Compare and Contrast 2 Species, Worksheet and Resources


Let’s begin by reviewing some important definitions: Native species are animals and plants that live in an area naturally, without any human intervention. Nonnative (exotic, alien) species are animals and plants living outside their native ranges as a result of human activity. Invasive species are nonnative plants or animals that cause harm to the environment, economy, or human health. Did you know that Florida has more nonnative reptile and amphibian species than anywhere else in the world? And that more than 80% of the nonnative reptiles and amphibians in Florida arrived here through the pet trade? Worldwide, invasive species are one of the top causes of species endangerment and extinction. In this lesson, students will investigate two Everglades invasive species part of the Dirty Dozen using both video and written resources. Students will complete a T-chart to summarize the information they found on both species and they will compare and contrast these two species by completing a Venn diagram. Click to download T-chart Click to download Venn diagram Watch the video, Invasion of the Snakehead, http://www.odysseyearth.com/videos/invasion-of-the-snakeheads/ and begin to complete your T-chart. Now, read about the Bullseye Snakehead using this factsheet to complete the Snakehead column of your T-chart. https://www.evergladescisma.org/the-dirty-dozen/bullseye-snakehead/ Now you are ready to investigate a second Everglades invasive species, the Tegu Lizard. Watch this video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2gsX6Na1o0 And read this factsheet, https://www.evergladescisma.org/the-dirty-dozen/tegu-lizards/ to complete the second column of your T-chart. Now, use the information you collected in your T-chart to complete the Venn diagram that compares and contrasts these two Everglades invasive species. Click to download Invasive Species T-Chart Teacher Key




American Alligators Vs. American Crocodiles, Video and T-Chart


Did you know there are thousands of species that live in the Everglades? They all play an important role in the Everglades ecosystem. Today we are going to focus on one of the most well-known Everglades species of all, an iconic, powerful reptile species that has over 1 million of them living in the state of Florida alone. Did you guess the American alligator? There is so much to learn about the American alligator, a species that is protected and vital to the Everglades ecosystem. American alligators are a keystone species in the Everglades, a species that changes the environment for its own use in a way that helps other plants and animals. Learn more about the American alligator by watching this video from Everglades National Park. Did you learn about the other reptilian species that lives in the Everglades too? The Everglades is the only place in the world that is home to both the American alligator and American crocodile! After viewing the video, fill out the T-chart to describe the following differences between each species:

  • Shape of the snout
  • Skin color
  • Teeth
  • Habitat
Click to download T-chart Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grade 2 - Lesson 2 Everglades Seasons https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/second-grade -Students will act out an ecodrama in an alligator hole during the dry season. Each student will play a role of an animal that depends on the alligator hole. Students will identify the American alligator as a keystone species that enables other species to survive. Extension: To learn more about alligator holes and why they are important, have your students act out a virtual ecodrama! Each student will be assigned a species that uses the alligator hole for survival. Have your students make a hat or a sign that indicates which species they are and when it is their turn to act, have them make the sounds and move like the animal would in the ecosystem. Extension Wrap-up: Have the students answer the following questions in their science notebooks:
  • What are the two seasons that occur in the Everglades? Wet and dry.
  • Why are Alligators important to other wildlife? As a keystone species, they change their environment and provide for other species.
  • What does the American alligator provide for wildlife? Water and a place to live.
  • What does the wildlife provide for the American alligator? Food.
  • Why do American alligators dig these alligator holes? To create a home.
  • How do alligator holes help other animals? Provide water and food.
  • How can we help protect the American alligator? Answers will vary but should include habitat protection, do not feed the wildlife, no illegal hunting, etc.




Everglades H.I.P.P.O.(C). Threats- Acrostic Activity Sheet


The Everglades provides ecosystem services, or natural services that support life on Earth and are essential to the quality of human life and to the functioning of the world’s economy. The wetlands in the Everglades filter and clean the water, giving us fresh water to drink, and the different habitats provide flood control, water storage, and protection. This is why it is so important to protect the Everglades. But the Everglades is in trouble. Using the acronym H.I.P.P.O. (C), we can learn about some of the threats to the Everglades. An acronym is a form of abbreviation used for many purposes, like remembering something. An acrostic is a poem in which certain letters in each line form words or sentences.
Directions: After reviewing the H.I.P.P.O. (C), threats, students will use the word map below to create an acrostic poem using the words provided for each threat. Click to download Everglades acrostic activity sheet and word map H-Habitat Loss- When plants and animals’ habitats are converted from usable to unusable habitat. I-Invasive Species- Organisms that are harmful when introduction or spread threatens the natural environment. P- Pollution- The introduction of contaminants into the natural environment that cause negative change. P- Human Population- Total number of humans living on earth. More people require more land space and other resources. O- Overconsumption- A situation where resource use has outpaced the sustainable capacity of the ecosystem. C- Climate Change- The change in global patterns, attributed largely to the increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced using fossil fuels. Everglades Literacy Connection: Grade 8, Lesson 2 Threats to the Everglades https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/eighth-grade -Students will evaluate different benefits (ecosystem services) that the Everglades provides to humans. They will learn about six different threats that impact the Everglades ecosystem and humans, and design a poster for each threat.




How Conserving a Species Works- A Look Into the Florida Panther Recovery Plan (Third Revision) by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (FWS), Resources and Worksheet


Big cat conservation has been in the news quite a lot recently. In the Everglades, big cat conservation is especially important for one of the most at risk species in the world. Have you ever wondered exactly how wildlife conservation works? Learn more about the efforts to save the Florida panther. The Florida panther is Florida’s state mammal and is the last subspecies of Puma still surviving in the eastern United States. It is listed as endangered, a species "in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range". These species are rare to find and are top priority for wildlife conservationists to save. This video explains what has caused the Florida panther’s overall decline, primarily from humans and habitat loss But, that is not to say humans have not taken action to reduce their impact on the panthers’ survival in the Florida Everglades. In fact, as a product of the collaboration of various recovery teams, contractors, state agencies, and others, the Florida Panther Recovery Plan (Third Revision) was created and published in 2008 by the U.S. Florida Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The goal of this detailed recovery plan is to achieve long-term viability of the Florida panther in its wild habitat in the Everglades. With the dedication of many entities involved in the creation of this plan, it is clear how important recovery is for the Florida panther. Directions: Have your students read the Florida Panther Recovery Plan excerpt pages 1-14 (click to download) After reading, have your students use their critical thinking and analysis skills to complete the student activity worksheet about the Florida Panther Recovery Plan. Please keep in mind this article is intended for higher grade levels, however this activity may be adapted for younger grades. Click to download Florida panther recovery plan worksheet Click to download Florida panther recovery plan answer key For additional information visit: FWS’s Recovery Planning and Implementation Page: https://www.fws.gov/endangered/esa-library/pdf/RPI.pdf FWS’s ECOS Environmental Conservation Online System showing all wildlife species with Recovery Plans: https://ecos.fws.gov/ecp0/reports/species-with-recovery-plans-report Everglades Literacy Connections: Grade 5. Lesson 1 - Incredible Shrinking Habitat https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/fifth-grade​​​​​​​ -Students will become Florida panthers, white-tailed deer, and motor vehicles in an active, tag-like game to simulate the disappearance of Everglades habitat and its effect on native wildlife.




South Florida’s National Parks Video and Worksheet


Happy National Park Week--get to know South Florida’s National Parks! Watch this Odyssey Earth video to learn more about Everglades National Park, Biscayne National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, and Dry Tortugas National Park. Each of these sites is unique and home to a variety of wildlife on land and in the water. Students will fill out the worksheet as they watch along with the Odyssey Earth video. Ask your students which park they want to visit the most! Do you or your students have any pictures or memories from visiting one of these national parks? Share with us! Please use the hashtag #EvergladesLiteracy and tag The Everglades Foundation social media handles: Facebook: @evergladesfoundation Twitter: @evergfoundation Instagram: @evergladesfoundation




Everglades Water Flow: Historic vs. Altered


If someone were to tell you that you live in the Everglades, would you believe them? Historically, the Everglades watershed spans about one-third of our state historically, starting near Kissimmee and spanning all the way down to Florida Bay. If you live in the Everglades watershed region, you are living in an altered Everglades ecosystem. It provides us with resources like fresh water and is important for tourism, the economy, and so much more. Learn more about the historic and altered Everglades watershed by watching this River of Grass video by Odyssey Earth and filling out the Anticipation Guide. Then use the Everglades Water Flow: Historic and Altered Worksheet to navigate through the changes to the watershed and understand how it impacts us, wildlife, and the economy. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connection: Grades 9-12: The Heart of a Watershed --In small groups, students build a landscape model to illustrate the uniqueness of the Kissimmee-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades (K-O-E) watershed, and then modify the model to demonstrate how alterations have affected the K-O-E watershed.




Everglades History Timeline Activity, Worksheet and Answer Key


Why should we understand past events that have shaped the Everglades? To find ways to restore the Everglades, we need to understand how the Everglades functioned before the area was drained and developed, beginning in the late 1800s. We should also celebrate the important events that have happened and are still happening that contribute to restoring the Everglades. While it is impossible to return the entire Everglades to pre-development conditions, understanding how the Everglades has been modified by people helps us understand the current challenges to Everglades restoration and how to best meet those challenges with sound solutions. With this Everglades History Timeline Activity, do online research to match specific Everglades history events to the dates on the provided timeline to create a timeline of the Everglades, past and present. Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections: Grades 6-8, Grade 6, Lesson 1 – Kissimmee – Lake Okeechobee – Everglades (K-O-E) Students will be able to identify locations and waterways in the Kissimmee-Okeechobee-Everglades (K-O-E) watershed on a map after watching a video and reading a story. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/sixth-grade Grades 9-12, Environmental Factors of the Everglades, Lesson 1 – Heart of a Watershed In small groups, students build a landscape model to illustrate the uniqueness of the Kissimmee-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades (K-O-E) watershed, and then modify the model to demonstrate how alterations have affected the K-O-E watershed. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-our-watershed




Pig Frog and Shell-Less Egg Experiment


How is an egg like a pig frog in the Everglades? A pig frog is an indicator species. An indicator species is defined as a species whose abundance in any given area is believed to indicate certain environmental or ecological conditions or suitable conditions for a group of other species. For example, a high concentration of pig frogs in an area, like the Everglades, indicates that the wetland ecosystem has good water quality and an overall healthy system. The pig frog has semi-permeable skin allowing some of the water to pass through in order for it to breath and hydrate. If the water is full of toxins and pollutants, then the toxins can pass through the pig frog’s skin and negatively affects the health of the pig frog. Pig frogs are animals that scientists use to check on the wellness of the Everglades ecosystem. If something is wrong with these animals, then it is a good chance that there is a bigger problem that needs to be fixed in the ecosystem. Like the pig frog skin, the egg has a semi-permeable membrane. It lets some water pass through it while trying to keep the bacteria out. Follow along with this experiment that can be done at home to learn more about the pig frog's skin: Click to download student experiment sheet. Follow along with this video of the experiment: Click to download video. Watch this short video clip to see what other cool things scientists are learning about pig frogs in the Everglades: Everglades pig frog video.




How Florida Droughts Affect the Everglades and Us


There are many challenges associated with Everglades restoration, particularly with the quantity and timing of available water. Too much or too little water adversely affects the Everglades ecosystems, Florida residents living in urban areas, and the economy of the state. The periods of low rainfall in combination with water supply operations create lower water levels in the Everglades, resulting in droughts. Precisely, a drought is defined as “a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall, leading to a shortage of water”. To better understand the potential impacts of droughts on the Everglades and us, watch this Economic Impact of Droughts in South Florida presentation by the 2011 Arthur R. Marshall Foundation Summer Interns. Directions: Have students watch the Economic Impact of Droughts in South Florida presentation. After watching, have your students use their critical thinking and analysis skills to complete the student activity worksheet. Please keep in mind this video presentation is intended for higher grade levels, however this activity may be adapted for younger grades. Student Activity Worksheet Student Activity Worksheet Answer Key For additional information visit: ● The U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM) online map: https://www.drought.gov/drought/states/florida ● Long-term drought conditions by the Florida Division of Emergency Management: https://www.floridadisaster.org/hazards/drought/ Everglades Literacy Connections: Grades 9-12 Water Use and Society: Lesson 2: A Question of Quantity --Students will look at a typical water conservation plan and analyze it from the viewpoint of various stakeholders. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-water-use-and-society Grades 9-12 Everglades Restoration: Lesson 3: A look at CERP --Students will analyze information about various current and ongoing Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) projects and report on the progress that is being made. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-everglades-restoration Grade 8 Human Impacts: Lesson 1: Sponging Off the Everglades --Students will participate in a lab experiment where they identify the different water users in the Everglades and how much water is consumed by each user group. Students will recognize ways to conserve water and discuss why water conservation is important to the Everglades. https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/eighth-grade




Everglades Wildlife Watch: Observing the Bald Eagle


The Bald Eagle was selected as the national bird of the United States in 1782 and this iconic bird of prey lives in the Florida Everglades. In this lesson, students will observe through a live webcam what is happening at any given time in an active Bald Eagle nest located in southwestern Florida. Over the course of three days, they will use an observation journal with guiding questions to make qualitative observations about these Bald Eagles and their activities and record their data using an ethogram chart. Encourage your students to describe what they see in detail; this will help them identify key characteristics of their focus of study and make more knowledgeable inferences. Everglades Wildlife Watch: Observing the Bald Eagle Lesson Plan Student Page and Ethogram Chart Bald Eagle Observation Journal Additional Standards: SC.1.N.1.2, SC.4SCN.1.6, SC.K.N.1.5, SC.2.N.1.1 Everglades Literacy Lesson Connections:

Grade 3, Lesson 1 – Hurry for a Habitat --Students will use a relay race activity to reinforce knowledge learned in Lesson 1 and Lesson 2 (Everglades habitats, animals, and plants). https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/third-grade

Grades 9-12 Adaptations in Everglades Ecosystems Lesson 2: Design a Perfect Beast --Students become “bioengineers” by engineering an animal that is adapted to a specific Everglades ecosystem, creating “perfect beast.” https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/9th-12th-amazing-adaptations




Build an Airboat at Home STEM Activity


Have you ever been on an airboat before? Have you ever wondered how scientists, researchers, and even students travel into the heart of the Everglades to study its plant and wildlife? The answer is airboats! Learn more about how airboats work, how they are built, and watch a tutorial of how you can make an airboat at home with this lesson plan: Click to download lesson plan. Watch a video of an airboat gliding through the Everglades here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JGvHQTTm5E Then watch how an airboat is made here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LSjA8Jn7J4 Use the engineering process to design and create your own airboat, and watch as a member of The Everglades Foundation Education Team builds an airboat at home!




The Floridian Flamingo-Reading Comprehension


The American Flamingo, also known as the Floridian Flamingo, is the icon of the tropics. You've seen them everywhere; adorning flower beds and pools, gracing neon signs, and printed on vacation style clothing. Read The Floridian Flamingo article by Dr. Ruscena Wiederholt to explore the history of the flamingo in our state and discover its connection in South Florida. Click to download reading comprehension questions.




Butterflies of South Florida - Reading Comprehension


Butterflies are an important part of Florida’s ecosystem. An abundance of butterflies usually indicates that an ecosystem is thriving. Butterflies are also pollinators, in that they carry pollen to a new plant helping it produce seeds and grow, giving us flowers and food to eat. Read the article here: Butterflies of South Florida Download the comprehensive questions worksheet here: Butterflies of South Florida Reading Comprehension




Snowy Egrets - Reading Comprehension


While we are in the middle of a hot, Florida summer, there is one Everglades bird species who looks like it has been snowed on recently. Snowy egrets have fluffy, white feathers resembling messy hairdos in the wind. These plumes were once so popular in women’s fashion that they were worth twice their weight in gold. Learn more about the beautiful plumes and unique physical features of the snowy egret by reading Snow Animals of the Everglades and download the reading comprehension questions.




Burmese Pythons in your Backyard - Reading Comprehension


What's taller than a giraffe, weighs up to 200 pounds, and can swallow deer in a single gulp? If you guessed Burmese python, the notorious invader of South Florida, you're correct! Learn all about how this invasive species came to be in South Florida, and what to do if you spot one in this reading comprehensive activity. Read the article excerpt: Burmese Pythons in your Backyard Download the reading comprehensive questions here: Comprehensive Questions




Everglades Habitats Mapping Activity


In this activity, students will create their own maps of Everglades habitats. Students will learn about the five important components of a map, review Everglades habitats, plants and animals, and use their creative skills to draw their own version of an Everglades habitat map. Download Everglades Habitats Mapping Activity here Download Student Procedures here Download Everglades Mapping Activity PowerPoint National Geographic mapping resources




Compare and Contrast: Organisms of the Everglades


The Everglades is a special place in Florida and home to nearly 2,000 plant and animal species. These include the Florida panther, West Indian manatee, Roseate spoonbill, cypress trees, mangrove trees, and so many more. Use the Everglades Organisms Compare and Contrast Worksheet to learn more about 8 Everglades animal species. Students will review the physical traits of each species, explain how they are used for survival, and classify their species into the correct animal group. Compare and Contrast Worksheet Compare and Contrast Answer Key Wrap up by asking your students which species is their favorite and if they have seen it in the wild before.




Chief Scientist of The Everglades Foundation


Hear from the Chief Scientist of The Everglades Foundation as she describes research and modeling programs designed to better understand origins and localized levels of phosphourous pollution in the Everglades. Video and Lesson Plan link Guided Note-Taking Sheet Follow along with the Guided Note-Taking Sheet provided for research methods to understand Phosphorous in the Everglades.




Protecting our Everglades and Connecting to our Watershed: From Home and Always


Do you know where your water comes from? There are 8.7 million residents of south Florida (1 out of 3 Floridians) who rely on the Everglades for their water supply. Join us to learn more about The Everglades Foundation’s educational programming as we navigate through the Everglades watershed using an interactive presentation focusing on water usage, where our water comes from, and the importance of the Everglades ecosystem. Understanding the Everglades watershed ensures future generations of Floridians understand the ecological and economic value of the Everglades ecosystem. Water is important to the health of the Everglades, and the health of the Everglades is important to us! Click to download Everglades Watershed Worksheet




Be on the Lookout for Birds STEM Activity


Can't get outside? Look out your window! There are 349 species of birds that live in the Everglades! Can you name one? See if you can draw a picture of a bird and the habitat that it lives in. Explore and research some regional species that you may see: Blue Jay, Northern Cardinal, Northern Mockingbird, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Tufted Titmouse. Use this Bird Research Sheet to record your findings. STEM Challenge: After researching your species plan and design a bird feeder using recycled materials. Use this Student Sheet: Bird Feeder to help you with this challenge. Want to learn more? Check out this Bird Bingo activity from Florida Audubon. https://fl.audubon.org/sites/default/files/bingo_card_0.pdf




Everglades Swamp Symphony


Encourage your students to step outside and explore the natural world around them using their senses! Do you hear that? Find a safe outdoor space, close your eyes, take a deep breath, and listen. Try to block out all the sounds made by people, and tune into all the magical sounds of our natural world. It sounds like a symphony, an elaborate musical composition that has many notes and sounds. Challenge yourself to take it a step further, conduct a little research, and to match the sounds with the actual animal. Do you think they live in the Everglades? Have you students or children use this interactive website from SwampScapes to make their own Swamp Symphony. Record it and share it with your classmates in your next virtual meetup. Swamp Symphony: http://swampscapes.org/swamp-symphony.html Everglades Literacy Connections: 1st grade Lesson 1- Everglades Animal Exploration https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/first-grade Students will learn that animals communicate through their senses. The students will use their knowledge and imagination to vocally and/or physically imitate wildlife of the Everglades. Kindergarten Lesson 3 - Who Lives in the Everglades? https://www.evergladesliteracy.org/kindergarten Students will engage in an interactive presentation to review some of the animals that live in the Everglades. Then, they follow up with classifying animals that do and do not live in the Florida Everglades.





 
 
turtle.jpg

CONTACT US

18001 Old Cutler Road, Suite 625 

Palmetto Bay, Florida 33157
Phone: (305) 251-0001

info@evergladesliteracy.org